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Muia Wins Japanese Debut in Setagaya

by Brett Larner

2017 Kenyan Prisons XC champion Bernard Muia (Team Toyota Boshoku) made a strong Japanese debut at Saturday's Setagaya Time Trials meet in western Tokyo, outrunning teammate Amos Kirui to win the 3000 m A-heat in a PB 7:50.68.  Kirui also set a PB, running 7:51.48.  Taking 3rd, former 1500 m and 5000 m national champion Yuichiro Ueno (DeNA RC) was a fraction of a section of his university-era PB dating back to 2006 as he ran 7:58.03.

Kenyan teammates also went 1-2 in the women's 3000 m A-heat.  Rosemary Wanjiru (Team Starts) ran one of the better times of her career to win in 8:51.61.  Her teammate Grace Kimanzi was well back in 2nd in 9:12.45, with high schooler Shuri Ogasawara (Yamanashi Gakuin Prep H.S.) not far behind in 3rd in 9:18.37.

The men's 5000 m A-heat turned out to be a Kenya-Ethiopia duel.  Up front, Alfred Ngeno (Team Nissin Shokuhin) took 1st in 13:35.29 less than half a second ahead of Abiyot Abinet (Team Yachiyo Kogyo).  Futher back, Rodgers Chumo Kwemoi (Team Aisan Kogyo) edged Kassa Mekashaw (Team Yachiyo Kogyo) by a similar margin for 3rd in 13:40.25.  Continuing an apparent return to the track after a stalled transition to the marathon, former national champion Yuki Sato (Team Nissin Shokuhin) was the top Japanese man at 5th in 13:43.44.

Setagaya Time Trials
Kinuta Park Field, Setagaya, Tokyo, 4/8/17
click here for complete results

Men's 3000 m Heat 5
1. Bernard Muia (Kenya/Toyota Boshoku) - 7:50.68 - PB
2. Amos Kirui (Kenya/Toyota Boshoku) - 7:51.48
3. Yuichiro Ueno (DeNA RC) - 7:58.03
4. Kei Fumimoto (Kanebo) - 8:07.96
5. Victor Mutai (Kenya/Kanebo) - 8:09.18

Women's 3000 m Heat 3
1. Rosemary Wanjiru (Kenya/Starts) - 8:51.61
2. Grace Kimanzi (Kenya/Starts) - 9:12.45
3. Shuri Ogasawara (Yamanashi Gakuin Prep H.S.) - 9:18.37
4. Nana Sato (Starts) - 9:18.95
5. Kyoka Nakagawa (Japan Post Group) - 9:21.75

Men's 5000 m Heat 16
1. Alfred Ngeno (Kenya/Nissin Shokuhin) - 13:35.29
2. Abiyot Abinet (Ethiopia/Yachiyo Kogyo) - 13:35.74
3. Rodgers Chumo Kwemoi (Kenya/Aisan Kogyo) - 13:40.25
4. Kassa Mekashaw (Ethiopia/Yachiyo Kogyo) - 13:41.05
5. Yuki Sato (Nissin Shokuhin) - 13:43.44

© 2017 Brett Larner
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http://sankei.jp.msn.com/politics/local/081107/lcl0811071352000-n1.htm
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