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Kawauchi 6th in First Marathon After Being Named to London World Championships Team

http://www.sponichi.co.jp/sports/news/2017/04/02/kiji/20170402s00057000453000c.html

translated and edited by Brett Larner

London World Championships team member Yuki Kawauchi (30, Saitama Pref. Gov't) ran the Apr. 2 Daegu International Marathon in South Korea, finishing 6th in 2:13:04.  Daegu was Kawauchi's first full marathon since being named to the World Championships team in March.  Coming up short of his pre-race goal of a sub-2:10, Kawauchi finished over five minutes behind winner Matthew Kisorio (Kenya) who won in 2:07:32.  "I lost touch with the lead group after 5 km, and it ended up being a tough race like in Porto last year," he told JRN post-race.  "We did the first 5 km in 14:58.   For the next 5 km the lead group went about 14:46, and for my current condition that was just too fast. At the same time, I managed to shake off a 2:05 runner and a 2:06 runner and ran down two people after 40 km, so it did bear some fruit.

With Daegu marking the start of his buildup to his final Japanese national team appearance at August's London World Championships, Kawauchi plans to run May's Volkswagen Prague Marathon, June's ASICS Stockholm Marathon, and July's Gold Coast Airport Marathon.  "Between now and Prague I have improve my speed a little in order to be able to handle a move in the 14:40 split range," he said.

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http://sankei.jp.msn.com/politics/local/081107/lcl0811071352000-n1.htm
http://www.tokyo42195.org/2009/news/post_13.html

translated and edited by Brett Larner

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